The Influence of Subjects' Personality Traits on Predicting Comfortable Human-Robot Approach Distances

TitleThe Influence of Subjects' Personality Traits on Predicting Comfortable Human-Robot Approach Distances
Publication TypeConference Paper
Year of Publication2005
AuthorsWalters ML, Dautenhahn K, Koay KL, Kaouri C, Woods SN, Nehaniv CL, Boekhorst R, Lee D, Werry I
Conference NameProceedings of Cog Sci 2005 Workshop: Toward Social Mechanisms of Android Science
AbstractThis study began with the hypothesis that the approach distances people prefer when interacting with a robot are similar to those that strangers prefer when interacting with each other. Our experiments involving humans interacting with a mobile robot confirm this hypothesis: the results show that a majority (60%) of the human subjects tested take up initial approach distances that are compatible with normal human-human social interaction distances. However, surprisingly, a large minority of subjects in the experiments (40%) took up positions which were significantly closer, suggesting that they were not treating the robot as a ‘social entity’. We then tested the hypothesis that this large minority of subjects’ had common personality factors that predicted their likely approach distance preferences. The subjects’ personalities were assessed using several traits from the three-factor Eysenck personality model. Further analysis of the data identified four new factors, different from Eysenck’s model, tentatively labeled “Proactiveness”, “Social Reluctance”, “Timidity” and “Nervousness”. When testing for correlations between approach distances and personality data, “Proactiveness” correlates with social distance, i.e. subjects that score higher on this factor come less close to the robot.
URLfile:///C:\Documents and Settings\Mick\My Documents\Herts University\Papers\Papers2005\Androids2005\Submitted\Walters_29_6.pdf
Posted by mickwalters on Thursday, 19 February, 2009 /

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